Trans-Centered Beauty Classes, Anti-Mom Bias, Artists with Disabilities

Sephora Is Launching In-Store Beauty Classes for Trans People, by Arabelle Sicardi of them.

Beginning in June 2018, French cosmetics chain Sephora will offer “a series of in-store programming around the country for the trans and nonbinary community, hosted and developed by transgender Sephora cast members.” These complimentary workshops add another dimension to Sephora’s Classes for Confidence, a program launched in 2016 to help people through “major life transitions” like re-entering the workforce and “beauty in the face of cancer.” The company also plans to post a series of YouTube beauty tutorials as a supplement to its in-store programming. During a year that “has already proven to be one of the worst so far on record for trans people in the U.S., and particularly for trans women of color,” writes Arabelle Sicardi, “To see a company cater to the trans and queer community not as token models in one-off beauty campaigns, but in centering us as essential to their community is a relief.”

The Open Secret of Anti-Mom Bias at Work, by Katherine Goldstein of the New York Times

While stories of sexual harassment and gender discrimination have taken center-stage in recent months, “the struggles of mothers specifically have been largely left out of the spotlight—even though…the bias against them is often casual, open and unapologetic.” There have been numerous cases reported in which women have been fired, fiscally punished, and passed over for promotions due to having children—and studies show these are not isolated incidents. Not only are mothers often and inaccurately seen as “less competent and committed to their jobs,” but they are offered salaries that are on average $11,000 less than those offered to women candidates without children, and are 37% less likely to be offered the job in the first place. In the long run, this can leave women trailing far behind men in terms of of compensation and professional advancement, which “often has a big impact on who makes it to top leadership positions…in turn [determining] who’s setting policies that affect younger mothers who are coming up in the workforce.” While journalist Katherine Goldstein notes that mothers are likely refraining from speaking up due to sexism and sheer exhaustion, she hopes that a high-profile case will rise to people’s attentions and begin a much-needed conversation.

Artists With Disabilities Want More Than Representation, They Want Work, by Laura Pellicer and Frank Stasio of WUNC 91.5

At “A Series of Fortunate Events,” a North Carolina-based arts celebration for artists with disabilities, host Frank Stasio sat down with Betsy Ludwig, executive director of Arts Access, actor Douglas Kapp, and musician Chris Hendricks to discuss “how people with disabilities are fighting to take back their own narratives.” Kapp explained how directors have either refused or been reluctant to offer him parts due to the physical demands of roles. Noting the tremendous ability of artists with disabilities to tell their own stories, Hendricks went on to say, “Hollywood often times does turn an eye away from a talent that they know exists because they assume there’s a hardship that also doesn’t exist. They assume it’s going to be a pain for them. And that is just not the case a lot of the time.”

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artists
beauty
disabilities
disability rights
gender discrimination
LGBTQ
mothers
sephora
transgender
workplace

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