How can you measure the progress you’ve made on building inclusion in the workplace?

If you’ve been following this employment lifecycle series, you’re on the right track to hiring more diverse employees, fostering inclusive leadership, and creating an inclusive culture in your organization. Now it’s time to consider how you’ll measure your progress over time.

Diversity by the Numbers

On the most basic level, you can look at diversity by the numbers. You can plan an annual report on the demographics of your workforce, and use that to make comparisons year-to-year and against other companies in your industry.

One way to concretely reflect your commitment to developing a diverse workforce is to introduce inclusion KPIs. Making diversity and inclusion a core goal that falls in line with profitability will motivate the hiring team to take the task seriously, and keep you accountable. Measure and reward the work of managers who maintain a diverse team and successfully nurture employees from marginalized groups into leadership roles.

While we’re on the subject of numbers, take the time to track and review your retention rates for the employees you hire from marginalized backgrounds. Are those employees leaving at higher rates than others? Did you have thoughtful exit interviews with them to gain insight into why they were leaving?

Once you’ve reviewed this data, determine if you need to reassess your company culture. You can start by revisiting our posts on Intent vs. Impact in the Inclusive Workplace, Bystander Intervention Skills for the Inclusive Workplace, and Diversity-Competent Mentoring.

Look at Your Company Culture

Now it’s time to take a look at your company culture as a whole. If you’re not already using one, you may want to consider a climate survey. A climate survey can serve as a detailed snapshot of your organizational culture at a certain point in time. You may think you’re growing inclusion, but does your workforce agree?

While it’s great to learn from the progress you’ve made in terms of representation and retention, you can take it a step further by gathering nuanced information about what your employees say and feel about the organization and its culture. A climate survey can help you absorb the kind of information that is otherwise hard to access: Do your employees feel appreciated? Do they feel like they belong?

A climate survey can serve as a detailed snapshot of your organizational culture at a certain point in time. ​

Fostering Inclusive Leadership

Let’s take one last look at where your company stands on fostering inclusive leadership: Are employees from marginalized groups on track to moving up in the organization? Do they have access to effective and personalized mentoring?

With commitment and good strategies in place, you’ll soon be reaping the benefits of your diversity hiring efforts. Once employees from marginalized groups reach higher levels of leadership, the momentum will build. Existing and prospective employees will see one of the true hallmarks of an inclusive organization—diversity in the upper ranks.

Do you want to foster inclusive leadership?
Check out our courses on inclusive hiring and organizational culture.

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This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.

In the U.S., we tend to have a narrow definition of what makes a good leader. How can we expand our vision of how a leader should look and act?

A key diversity competence for senior-level employees and hiring managers alike is ensuring that each employee has ample opportunity to develop into a successful leader.

Unfortunately, stereotypes about women, people of color, LGBTQ people, and people with disabilities can prevent us from viewing these employees as good leaders. The error of overlooking leadership potential in people born outside of the U.S., people from minority religious groups, and those with less culturally familiar leadership styles has also been widely reported.

In our society in particular, we tend to have a very narrow definition of what makes a good leader. So how can you ensure unconscious biases aren’t getting in the way of you spotting leadership potential and nurturing it? How can you broaden your view of what makes a good leader?

What makes a good leader?

We tend to assume good leaders are those who demonstrate traits typically associated with and celebrated in white, cisgender, able-bodied men, like assertiveness and competitiveness. On the contrary, though, there are countless ways to be a great leader that draw on very different qualities—not to mention, alternative leadership methods are actually linked to better results in the workplace:


The effectiveness of leadership styles depends on who’s being led.

It turns out that the effectiveness of the assertive, competitive leadership style may depend on who’s being led. One study showed that leaders with an assertive style performed poorly with employees who were also assertive, but successfully with employees who were less assertive. The converse was also found: leaders with an introverted style performed best with more assertive employees.

Listening to others and being flexible is key.

Leaders who are encouraged to listen to others’ opinions and cultivate their own distinct leadership style (rather than following rigid norms) have been known to demonstrate thoughtful decision-making, inspire trust and commitment office-wide, and increase worker satisfaction and performance.

Collaboration is often more effective than competitiveness.

Studies also tell us that a leadership style that is marked by collaboration—and typically demonstrated by female leaders—is more effective on certain key measures than a style marked by competitiveness.

Identifying Leadership Potential

When mentoring employees and scouting for leadership, keep in mind the following guidelines:

>   Imagine potential leaders from a broad range of backgrounds.
>   Keep in mind that there are many ways to lead.
>   Ask whether your team might perform better with a leadership style that’s less familiar to you.
>   Encourage your employees to pursue their own authentic leadership style, rather than striving to fit into a stereotype of what makes a good leader.

Encourage your employees to pursue their own authentic leadership style, since there are many ways to lead.

Do you want to foster inclusive leadership?
Check out our courses on inclusive hiring and organizational culture.

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This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.

How do you ensure that employees from underrepresented backgrounds receive fair, unbiased performance reviews?

When evaluating and providing feedback to employees from underrepresented backgrounds, how do you ensure you’re reviewing everyone fairly, especially when unfamiliarity could invite an extra layer of bias into the process?

Negative stereotypes tend to fill the gaps in our knowledge about other people—especially those from stigmatized backgrounds—even when we are not aware of it. As a result, performance reviews of those employees are likely to be more negative.

Higher Scrutiny

Some reports from people of color in the workplace show that bias can take the form of more stringent—albeit informal—performance reviews. For instance, people of color report that supervisors paid more attention to their mistakes than to those of majority-group colleagues, and cited arbitrary details like their tone and how they wear their hair as evidence of unprofessionalism.

Soft Performance Reviews

On the other hand, negative stereotypes (like those regarding competence and ability), may lead an evaluator to conclude that the employee is unlikely to succeed, and therefore is not worth the time and attention required of a thorough review.

A soft performance review may seem at first to be a good thing for employees—no criticism of their work! But what it really means is that they miss out on insight into where they have room for growth. In turn, these employees miss out on opportunities to build their careers as valued employees and be fairly considered for the tougher, better assignments and advancement positions.

In addition, soft reviews send the message that the employee isn’t important enough or isn’t taken seriously enough to warrant a robust review, which can have a negative impact on an employee’s morale and performance.

A soft performance review may seem like a good thing for employees, but they miss out on opportunities to build their careers.

When reviewing employees from marginalized groups, check for the tendency to fill in the blanks in your knowledge with negative stereotypes, especially given the common outcomes of high scrutiny and soft reviews. By self-correcting and helping your colleagues to do so as well, your employees will receive the kind of reviews that help them reach their full potential.

Ready to develop more everyday skills for managing bias?
Check out our courses on inclusive hiring and organizational culture.

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This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.

Making your mentoring initiative more inclusive has benefits for the whole team.

Based on studies of exit interviews, here are some of the most notable reasons employees from marginalized identity groups leave an organization, aside from bias and discrimination:

•     They don’t feel supported and valued
•     They don’t see diversity in the upper ranks
•     They perceive a lack of growth and advancement opportunities

A key way to improve retention among employees of marginalized groups is to address these concerns with a robust and diversity-competent mentoring program. If your organization plans to increase diversity, think of mentoring as integral to that goal.

In our last blog post, you learned that sharing the unwritten rules of success is an important aspect of inclusive mentoring. What are some other things to keep in mind when working with employees of different backgrounds and experiences?

Thinking about the difference between traditional and relational mentoring is a good place to start.

Traditional mentoring involves a one-way process in which a mentor lends information and insight to a mentee. This type of relationship is mostly focused on professional advancement, and sometimes includes assimilating a mentee to the existing workplace structures.

Some employees may benefit from elements of a traditional mentoring relationship, while others may thrive with the relational model.

Relational mentoring involves a two-way exchange in which both the mentor and mentee contribute to the relationship, and both professional and personal growth are addressed. While the mentor still equips the mentee with professional direction, they also look at how the mentee’s unique perspective and contributions can help the company grow.

Some employees may benefit from elements of a traditional mentoring relationship, while others may thrive with the relational model.

For example, studies show that some Latinx professionals prefer a relational approach to mentoring because they identify with a culture that typically values collectivism over individualism.

In addition to the overall approach to mentoring, you might consider the structure of your mentoring program.

For instance, scholars suggest that marginalized employees may benefit from having networks of different kinds of mentors. This might look like a combination of one-on-one mentoring and group mentoring.

Or maybe it means establishing employee resource groups (ERGs) and developing a sponsor system, whereby an influential senior employee is charged with proactively advocating for their mentee and helping them make their unique needs, preferences, and career goals heard and fairly considered.

By keeping the traditional vs. relational mentoring frameworks in mind, as well as different structures, you can begin to meet the unique needs—and enjoy the best performance—of employees from different identity groups.

Scholars suggest that marginalized employees may benefit from having networks of different kinds of mentors.

Do you want a more inclusive workplace?
Check out our courses on inclusive hiring and organizational culture.

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This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.

Are your employees from underrepresented groups in the know when it comes to your workplace’s unwritten rules for success?

New employees from underrepresented backgrounds face unique challenges when getting acquainted with your office culture. How can you help onboard new employees inclusively?

Not only do these new employees face stereotypes, microaggressions, and other forms of exclusion based on their identity group membership, they’re also often left out of nuanced, hard-to-see steps to success that seasoned employees and members of majority identity groups take for granted as common knowledge. Examples include an unspoken expectation to attend the office holiday party, and knowing to seek out high-profile assignments to make your work more visible.

Acknowledge The Unspoken, Unwritten Rules

It’s important to acknowledge that these rules are unspoken and unwritten—they aren’t official policy or included in a code of conduct. They’re typically ingrained in your existing office culture, and they can seem minor. After all, the holiday party seems like a casual gathering, right?

But unwritten rules can prove crucial for networking and advancement, and could negatively impact the way an employee is perceived if the rules go unheeded.

Unwritten rules can prove crucial for networking and advancement, and could negatively impact the way an employee is perceived if the rules go unheeded.

Studies show that members of the majority group are more likely to know the unwritten rules already. Since the dominant culture gets to define the rules in the first place, majority-group members tend to pick up on them more easily. They then share them with people like themselves as a matter of course.

Everyone—whether they’re specifically tasked with onboarding new employees, in a position of leadership, or just somehow in the know—should make a point of sharing the unwritten rules, especially with those who are less likely to have access to them.

Inclusive Mentoring

Once you’re alert to these rules, they’ll start to pop up everywhere. Start noting them to your colleagues when they come up. Over time, this will help someone who otherwise may not have had access to the rules. In fact, sharing the unwritten rules is likely to help everyone in your office feel included and capable.

Sharing the unwritten rules is also a critical element of inclusive mentoring. Inclusive mentors acknowledge that mentoring is not a race-, gender-, sexual identity-, or disability-neutral process. Instead, mentoring occurs in an environment studded with distinct challenges for members of marginalized and underrepresented groups. Mentors who share the unwritten rules address the career and social-psychological development of their mentee.

Mentoring is not a race-, gender-, sexual identity-, or disability-neutral process.

Keep an eye out for our next post, where we’ll do a deeper dive into inclusive mentoring.

Want to learn more ways to make your workplace inclusive?
Check out our courses on inclusive hiring and organizational culture.

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This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.

Do you know what steps to take when you see bias in the workplace? In this post, we discuss recognizing impact and intervening when you can.

In our previous post, we discussed intent versus impact and how jokes that were meant to poke fun could contribute to an overall climate of exclusion at work. Aside from focusing on the impact of what you say, how do you maintain an environment where everyone feels like a valuable member of the team?

Recognize the Impact of Exclusion

A workplace climate that disregards the experiences of team members from underrepresented and negatively stereotyped identity groups can impact performance, retention, and the mental health of its employees.

Research continues to tell us that, in a workplace that ignores or devalues diversity, professionals of marginalized groups are at increased risk to feel sadness, nervousness, and a lack of engagement with their colleagues. Poor physical health, self-isolation, and lowered expectations of oneself and the employer have all been scientifically associated with exclusionary work environments.

Over time, a climate like this causes profound cumulative harm to the targets, and degrades the quality of the work a team produces.

Skilled intervention can support and help the colleague impacted, and will inform the person who started the exchange about why their actions were exclusionary—without inciting a confrontation.​

Learn Bystander Intervention Skills

Your next question may be, What can I do about exclusion when I see it? You can intervene when you overhear or anticipate receiving a harmful comment or action at work. Skilled intervention can support and help the colleague impacted, and will inform the person who started the exchange about why their actions were exclusionary—without inciting a confrontation.

Effective interventions can include:

•   Interrupting the exchange (“Let’s talk about something else.”)

•   Sharing a story about the painful impact of a similar comment or action (“This reminds me of how my old coworkers used to always ask me where to find the best Chinese food. I’m Korean, not Chinese. I always felt misunderstood and isolated there.”)
•   Asking questions that reveal why the comment or action is harmful (“Are you saying women are less intelligent than men?”)

You can take it a step further by engaging in your colleagues’ interests and strengths, consciously including your colleagues in informal gatherings, and thinking of other small ways to counteract the daily actions that can make colleagues feel excluded.

Ready to develop more everyday skills for managing bias?
Check out our courses on inclusive hiring and organizational culture.

Learn More


This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.

Intent vs. impact: Why does it matter in an inclusive workplace?

When it comes to your actions and words in the office, a core tenet of diversity competence is understanding intent vs. impact.

Let’s say you make a joke at work. Maybe you say a colleague’s name in a joking way, or you imitate a colleague’s accent. You come to find that some of your colleagues—who you thought you were playfully teasing—were offended.

Maybe it’s not clear to you why they found the joke hurtful, and maybe some of them actually laughed along. Maybe your first reaction was to roll your eyes and dismiss them as “too sensitive” or “politically correct.”

INTENT VS. IMPACT

The thing is, jokes often depend on cultural norms that may not resonate with everyone—not to mention, many jokes are laced with stereotypes that seem funny to a certain crowd but may be just plain painful to another group.

In a diverse workplace, the actions and words you choose can take on different meanings than you intended.

Even if your colleagues from underrepresented backgrounds seemed cool with it at the time, a joke poking fun at their identity group—especially if it’s a marginalized or stigmatized group—can make them feel like they’ve been reduced to a stereotype or that the history of oppression they or their loved ones have faced is being reinforced.

Of course, you didn’t intend to make anyone feel uncomfortable. It was just a joke! But in a diverse workplace, the actions and words you choose can take on different meanings than you intended—and it’s your impact, not your intent, that matters more.

Make Anticipating Your Impact an Everyday Behavior

When you find yourself responding, “I didn’t intend to hurt anyone,” shift your perspective to the person you offended. Have you considered what your impact on this person might’ve been? Could your joke have reinforced painful stereotypes or called up histories of exploitation and oppression?

When you focus on the impact you have on others, you demonstrate a willingness to take stock of your actions and how they affect others. You encourage a sense of belongingness office-wide, which in turn reduces stress and increases emotional well-being and performance— especially for team members at risk of being excluded due to their identity group membership.

As your workplace becomes more diverse and you and your colleagues become more diversity-competent, you’ll likely become more familiar with your diverse colleagues’ experiences—and therefore less likely to gravitate toward stereotypes and tell jokes that offend in the first place.

When you focus on the impact you have on others, you demonstrate a willingness to take stock of your actions and how they affect others.

Want to learn more ways to make your workplace inclusive?
Check out our courses on inclusive hiring and organizational culture.

Learn More


This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.

When interviewing diverse candidates, searching for similarities, eliciting details, and asking for work samples is crucial.

So far in this blog series, we’ve covered how to:
•   define diversity and who’s diverse;
•   agree to conduct a search that addresses the impact of diversity resistance and unconscious bias;
•   address myths about competence and ability when it comes to hiring for diversity;
•   review marketing communications and job postings for exclusionary language; and
•   select and evaluate resumes according to explicitly agreed-upon criteria that allows full consideration of all candidates, whether they present familiar or unfamiliar credentials.

Now the interviews begin!

When interviewing candidates from underrepresented groups or backgrounds very different from your own, your standard approach to interviewing may need a tune-up. What can you do to curb the tendency to unconsciously favor majority-group membership or familiarity? Or to bridge the gap between your experiences and those of an unfamiliar candidate?

Here are few diversity-competent interviewing skills to hone when your candidate’s identity group or background is different than yours:

•   search for similarities to build rapport;
•   elicit details about the candidate’s experiences to reveal strengths you may not be aware of; and
•   incorporate work samples into the interview process.

Search for Similarities

If difference is making you feel like you can’t connect, deliberately look for things you have in common with your interviewee. You’ll be surprised by how easy it is to connect when you focus on similarities.

For example, if your interviewee uses a wheelchair and you’re having a hard time seeing past their physical disability, ask about their interests both in and outside the office. This will direct you to relevant information about the candidate, and away from common misconceptions about disability. You’ll both start to feel more comfortable, increasing the likelihood of having a successful interview.

Elicit Details

Once you establish some rapport, focus on what’s unique about the interviewee, and how their unfamiliar credentials and experience will be an asset to your team.

What can you do to curb the tendency to unconsciously favor majority-group membership or familiarity?

While it’s important to initially focus on similarities so both people feel comfortable, it’s also crucial not to ignore differences outright. The interviewee may have valuable skills that you don’t think to ask about because you’re unfamiliar with their experiences and background. For instance, the candidate in the wheelchair may have razor-sharp problem-solving skills from navigating non-accessible spaces on a daily basis. Make it a point to seek out these details.

Ask for Work Samples

Requesting work samples to supplement interviews will invite a more objective assessment of the interviewee and are an especially valuable tool when hiring for inclusion. Asking for a work sample is easy—first, consider the skills required for the position in question, then design a task that tests that skill.

For example, if it’s an editing job, have your candidates edit an article. Or if it’s a more technical position, ask candidates to build a simple tool or suggest solutions to a problem using relevant technical skills.

When evaluating the submitted work samples, use standardized rubrics so all candidates are measured against the same criteria, and assign qualified evaluators to review the candidates’ work. For the editing task, how many errors or omissions will you consider to be acceptable? For the technical task, does the person reviewing the coding sample have sufficient experience with that particular coding language?

The idea is to test for relevant competencies, rather than experiences that may be irrelevant, or to which some candidates never had access.

Supplementing interviews with work samples is a direct way of learning what a candidate can do and can help you avoid over-relying on factors like privileged work experiences or the prestige of the college they attended. When you find yourself leaning toward a candidate because of details to which you can personally relate, you can use the objective test results to curb that inclination. When you interview with diversity competence, you make better hiring decisions.

Want to learn how to communicate inclusively?
Check out our courses on inclusive hiring and organizational culture.

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This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.

Let’s say your search committee or hiring team is on the same page about the value of diversity.

You’ve stated your ground rules for the search and had some conversations about diversity resistance—and now the resumes come rolling in. With all of these highly qualified candidates to choose from, how can you make sure unconscious bias doesn’t cause you to favor one over the other?

Take note of when you start to gravitate toward a resume with credentials you instantly recognize or understand—maybe the candidate attended your alma mater, or you’re both members of the same Greek life organization. It’s not that a candidate with familiar credentials shouldn’t be considered, but you should be aware of how much weight those credentials carry in your mind.

Research shows that when we encounter a culturally familiar candidate, a few things happen:

•     we tend to downplay weaknesses and highlight strengths, and
•     we tend to apply ambiguous, shifting, and exclusionary criteria in a way that favors the familiar candidate.

How can you make sure unconscious bias doesn’t cause you to favor one candidate over the other?

Ambiguous Criteria

An example of ambiguous criteria is “cultural fit”—a concept often used in lieu of saying “They’re just not like us (so we don’t want them).” Cultural fit is usually a criterion that goes undiscussed and unspoken and tends to be justified with the rationale that a homogeneous team will perform better and have higher morale. In reality, a homogeneous team misses out on the benefits of diversity, like collaborative problem-solving and innovation.

Shifting Criteria

An example of shifting criteria is emphasizing the importance of a prestigious degree when considering an unfamiliar candidate, but downplaying prestige when considering a familiar candidate. To reduce bias in the decision process, be sure to establish criteria in advance so all candidates are evaluated according to the same factors.

Exclusionary Criteria

You should also consider removing, introducing, and ranking criteria in a way that doesn’t automatically favor those with familiar or majority-group backgrounds. Instead, take into account the achievements of candidates in your target groups.

For example, a woman may have faced more obstacles to professional advancement, or she may have had a different professional timeline than most men on account of mid-career maternity leave. You may want to rank how far a candidate has come in their own careers, along with the quality of their achievements, higher than how far a candidate has risen, or the quantity of their achievements.

When you revise your resume review process to grow diversity rather than stifle it, you welcome new candidates you hadn’t considered in the past. The next step is to meet and get to know those new candidates by interviewing with diversity competence.

Do you want a more diverse workforce?
Check out our courses on inclusive hiring and organizational culture.

Learn More


This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.

What do potential candidates from underrepresented groups think when they read your marketing and recruitment materials? Learn tips for making your language more inclusive.

If you’ve been following this employment lifecycle series, you’re clear on wanting to foster inclusivity and where you want to build representation, you’ve sought out new sources of recruitment, and you’ve widened your pool of candidates. But what if your newly identified recruits seem interested but hesitant? Or aren’t even applying?

Especially if your workplace is still predominantly white, straight, and male, you may worry that candidates from marginalized identity groups will be reluctant to join the team, and more importantly, that there’s nothing you can do about it. But there are steps you can take to ensure candidates feel welcome when joining your team.

For starters, review your marketing and recruitment materials for non-inclusive language and requirements that may turn a candidate off.

Beyond a statement of non-discrimination at the end of a job description, directly communicate the steps you’ve taken to integrate diversity and inclusion into all levels of your organization. Furthermore, consider how your communications come across to candidates of different groups. This small extra effort will better demonstrate your commitment to diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

When you use inclusive language in your marketing and recruitment materials, you show employees that they are valued.

For instance:

• Do you use “he” as your default pronoun to refer to both men and women, instead of using “he or she,”—or even better, the gender neutral “they?”

• Are there certain words in your job descriptions that we tend to associate with men more than women, like “assertive,” “dominant,” and “outspoken?” Studies show that job descriptions that include words like these decrease women’s interest and motivation in applying for the job. Consider whether those qualities are absolutely necessary for an employee to be successful in their position.

• Do you list unnecessary physical requirements or employ ableist words like “talk” when you could use “communicate,” “see” when you could use “detect,” or “carry” when you could use “transport” or “remove?”

• Do you signal exclusion by requiring oddly specific and non-essential job experiences that (generally) only majority-group members have access to, or that could easily be learned on the job? For instance, consider whether you really need an employee to have past experience in a “fast-paced tech start-up.” Could alternative experiences like working in a fast-paced restaurant or a scrappy community organization yield transferable skills and the same level of success on the job?

The language you choose reveals a lot about your organization’s culture. When you update the language in your marketing and recruitment materials to make them more inclusive, you communicate to all candidates that their unique contributions will be valued and that they’ll have opportunities to rise within the organization.

Do you want a more diverse workforce?
Learn more ways to make your workplace more welcoming.

Learn More


This post is part of a series addressed to HR and other hiring managers about integrating diversity competence into each step of the employment lifecycle, from recruitment and hiring, to creating an inclusive workplace, to evaluating and cultivating leaders who will take inclusive excellence at your enterprise to the next level.